On almost every topic
Georg Herold: Mandelbrot? Fragen Sie mal meine Mutter!, 1993
The Jeff Wall show at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam is great, but this work by Georg Herold I enjoyed most during my visit today. 

Georg Herold: Mandelbrot? Fragen Sie mal meine Mutter!, 1993

The Jeff Wall show at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam is great, but this work by Georg Herold I enjoyed most during my visit today. 

My first loaf of bread baked in a pot using the no knead bread recipe demonstrated in this New York Times video and following Jim Lahey’s recipe that can be found here.
The crust is great thanks to using the pot. I think I added too much salt as it is a tiny bit too salty for me, but other than that it is a very decent loaf of bread that you can make in no time.

My first loaf of bread baked in a pot using the no knead bread recipe demonstrated in this New York Times video and following Jim Lahey’s recipe that can be found here.

The crust is great thanks to using the pot. I think I added too much salt as it is a tiny bit too salty for me, but other than that it is a very decent loaf of bread that you can make in no time.

This looks like a great recipe to make your own bread in a cooking pot without the need for kneading the dough. This would solve the bread issue we have as we do not have a decent bakery nearby.

Trevor Paglen: “So while in one sense photography might be “over,” in another, it’s barely gotten going. And we haven’t seen anything yet”.

I am looking forward to seeing this movie by Spike Jonze. The movie makes a lot of people talking about AI and the Turing test and such. I had to think of Dr. Smile, the psychiatrist in a suitcase owned by main character Barney Mayerson in The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. It is my favorite book by Philip K. Dick. What I really like about Dr. Smile is that he is a real psychiatrist. He keeps calling Barney Mayerson Mr. Bayerson.

So far I am really enjoying this new book by food writer Michael Pollan. Of course I should not read about cooking, but spend the time in the kitchen cooking myself. I am still reading the part about barbecue as this is where it starts. Cooking originated by using fire to transform animals into something more nutritious and digestible.

I never barbecue myself as I live in an apartment building where open fire is strictly forbidden even if you have a terrace like we do. Our neighbor is an Australian and they have this giant outdoor kitchen, but it uses propane.

My best barbecue experience was when I was in South Africa for a consulting job. I was invited for a family barbecue. The host picked me up from the hotel and first we went shopping. We bought meat and biltong to have something to chew on while waiting for the food to be cooked. I bought some wine to bring and then we went to a place where you could buy wood. In South Africa they will never ever use charcoal like we do. It took my host forever to select the right wood and then we went to his house. I was introduced to his family and his son started cooking. While waiting we drank brandy and coke, another tradition in South Africa, and ate biltong. When the food was served it was the most delicious meat I ever tasted. Tasty, tender and juicy.

Multiple Alfresco Share Configuration Files

Like you can have multiple models in your Alfresco back-end project, you can also have multiple Share configuration files in your Alfresco Share project. This makes your Share configuration more readable. You can have for example a separate Share configuration file for your workflow form configuration and one to configure your custom content model.

You only need to provide a context file that references the configuration files using Spring bean configuration, just like in your back-end project.

Let’s say I have a custom model for partner agreements in the back-end. The following example references an agreement-share-config.xml file with the Share configuration for my partner agreement content model and an agreement.properties file for the labels.

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<!DOCTYPE beans PUBLIC '-//SPRING//DTD BEAN//EN' 'http://www.springframework.org/dtd/spring-beans.dtd'>
<beans>
  <!-- Share Configuration -->
  <bean id="custommodel.config" class="org.springframework.extensions.config.ConfigBootstrap"
	init-method="register">
    <property name="configService" ref="web.config" />
    <property name="configs">
      <list>
	<value>classpath:alfresco/web-extension/agreement-share-config.xml</value>
      </list>
    </property>
  </bean>
  <!-- Resource bundles -->
  <bean id="example.resources"
	class="org.springframework.extensions.surf.util.ResourceBundleBootstrapComponent">
    <property name="resourceBundles">
      <list>
	<value>alfresco.web-extension.agreement</value>
      </list>
    </property>
  </bean>
</beans>

Save the file for example as agreement-share-context.xml in the Share web-extensions folder where the Share configuration and the labels file are also located in this example. If you add things like type or aspect visibility or advanced search forms do not forget to set the replace attribute to false, otherwise it might overwrite settings in other Share configuration files.

This new release of Activiti Designer includes Kickstart, a simplified process editor and form editor that automatically generates the Alfresco artifacts and allows you to deploy them in various ways including using CMIS.

I have been playing with Kickstart a bit and must say it looks promising. At first it is a bit confusing as the process is not displayed as the traditional process designer with tasks and connecting arrows, but once you are used to it, it is quite powerful.

There are things not supported in this release like for example adding task listeners, but these will be added in future releases. Listeners for things like conditional tasks, e-mail notifications or to output task variables to the execution level are generated automatically.

For a good overview watch this video from the Alfresco Summit 2013: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9x9uYKONSE.

If a Time Traveller Saw a Smartphone

newyorker:

If a well-educated time traveller from 1914 met one of us, he would conclude that, in the past century, humans achieved a new level of superintelligence. But do a mobile phone and an Internet connection make us extraordinary? http://nyr.kr/1hk91vX

Illustration by Hannah K. Lee.